A Tattooed Angel

When he opened the driver’s side door and slid behind the wheel, the first thing I looked for was the knife. He had short-cropped hair, gray street clothes, a long scar on his right cheek bone. And tattoos. His body was awash in ink. The hands that toyed with the knobs on the dash had skulls on every finger. Russian script meandered around his neck. And in that language I did not know, he began questioning me.

My three-week teaching stint in Novosibirsk, Siberia, was about halfway over. A group of young men studying for the ministry met with me for a few hours every day to learn the little I knew of biblical interpretation. God help them. I was barely older than they were, younger than a couple of them. A wife, a three-year-old daughter, and a soon-to-be-born son awaited me back in Oklahoma. If I made it back.

I had seen the oncoming van. The tires, screaming their black and burning song, foretold the crash. The van, and the half a dozen men in it, hammered my side of the car. By the time we pulled off the side of the road, they had spilled out and surrounded our vehicle. To a man, they looked like they’d just returned from job interviews with the mafia. And been hired. Taking a deep breath, the driver told me, “Stay in the car,” and the lamb stepped out into the pack of wolves. No need to consult my handy-dandy Russian-to-English dictionary to translate the cursing, anger, and threats that erupted as the group ringed round my friend.

Then the driver’s side door opened. And the tattooed stranger sat down. He looked at me, and smiled a crooked smile. And I looked for the knife that never appeared. I figured he was one of the guys from the van; he looked cut from the same cloth. But if there was a storm around us, he was the eye of it. There was no anger or accusation in his tone as he chatted on with me about God knows what. I knew how to say, “I don’t speak Russian,” in Russian, which he must have taken as a cue to speak even more. And so began one of the most memorable conversations I’ve ever had. He asked me countless questions in Russian, I told him all about myself and my family in English, neither of us having the foggiest idea what the other was saying. And all the while his skulled fingers twisted and turned the car’s controls.

I’m not sure how much time elapsed—five, ten, fifteen minutes. And then he was gone. The door opened, he got out, and my driver got back in. He’d had enough cash on him to pacify the men.
“Who was that in the car?” he asked.
“I don’t know. I assumed he’d been from the van.”
“No, he wasn’t one of them.”
“Then I don’t know where he came from.”
And we drove on, safe and alive.

To this dImageay, when I read in Hebrews about entertaining angels unaware, my mind goes back to a car wreck in Siberia, in which no one was hurt, to the furious young men, who laid no hand on my friend, and to a stranger who showed such concern and curiosity about me. And I wonder if angels, sometimes, have tattoos.

 

 

 

 

If you’d like to read more reflections like this one, check out my new book, Christ Alone: Meditations and Sermons. If you’re looking for feel-good, saccharine devotional material, you’d better keep looking because you’re not going to find it here. If you’re looking for moralistic guides to the victorious Christian life, you’ll be thoroughly disappointed by all the Gospel in this book. But if you’re looking for reflections drenched in the Scriptures, focused through and through on the saving work of Jesus Christ, and guided by a law-and-Gospel approach to proclamation, then I daresay you’ll be pleased with this book. Purchase your copy by clicking on CreateSpace or Amazon. And thank you!

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3 thoughts on “A Tattooed Angel

  1. Love this story. I have had numerous encounters with what can only be described as angels. Or at the very least, they were extraordinary situations. One in particular was when I was trying to get my first restaurant business open. I was exhausted and broke and was looking at a very difficult physical amount of work to get finished. Suddenly, from nowhere, a man walked in and said, “May I help you?” I readily agreed. He worked with me for 6 hours straight. The job finished, I turned around and he was gone. Never saw him before or since.

  2. Reblogged this on Phil Brewer's Blog and commented:
    Love this story. I have had numerous encounters with what can only be described as angels. Or at the very least, they were extraordinary situations. One in particular was when I was trying to get my first restaurant business open. I was exhausted and broke and was looking at a very difficult physical amount of work to get finished. Suddenly, from nowhere, a man walked in and said, “May I help you?” I readily agreed. He worked with me for 6 hours straight. The job finished, I turned around and he was gone. Never saw him before or since.

  3. Suellen Dehnke on said:

    I’ve always felt I had an encounter with an angel too. I was a single Mom of 3 children, the older 2 with cerebral palsy. I was trying to take care of my kids with no help and no child support while I went to school full time and worked full time. Late one evening, exhausted, I stopped at the local grocery store on my way home. I stopped at a “everything a $1” kind of bin and an older woman was on the other side of the bin. She said “God is telling me to tell you that everything is going to be OK. Keep doing what you know is right and you will be rewarded”. We stood and talked for over an hour amongst the frozen peas. It was just one of those very rare in-depth conversations. We hugged and I walked away feeling encouraged and wondering what in the heck just happened to me.

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