Ten Ways You Can Help Your Pastor Be an Even Better Preacher

Image

View from the pulpit

If you sit in the pew on Sunday morning, part of you also stands in the pulpit. Whether you realize it or not, you have a hand in shaping every sermon that your pastor preaches. That’s because the word of God that your shepherd is expounding is not a one-size-fits-all message; he specifically tailored this sermon to fit the life situations of the saints whom he serves. He has you in his mind, and on his heart, when he preaches.

A Blessing and a Challenge

This is a blessing, but it’s also a tremendous challenge. It’s a blessing because who wants a sermon that’s like a Hallmark card, written vaguely enough to apply to just about any situation? Paul wrote very different letters to the churches at Rome and Corinth and Ephesus for a reason: each congregation had unique struggles which required different applications of the divine word to their situation. It’s no different today.

But this blessed, precise preaching is a weekly challenge. Your pastor, above all, wants his proclamation to remain true to the word of God. But he also wants it to remain fresh, creative, understandable, and applicable to his flock. When it comes to facing and overcoming this challenge, you can either assist your pastor or make it even more difficult for him. The part of you that stands in the pulpit with him can either be a help or a hindrance.

Here are ten suggestions on how you can be helpful, how you can make your pastor an even better preacher.

1. Spend time with your pastor outside of church. This can be as simple as enjoying a meal or a cup of coffee together during the week. Pastors cannot really get to know you if they know only the Sunday-morning you. Welcome his visits to your home. Include him and his family in your family’s life. The better he knows you outside of church, the better he will preach to you inside of church.

2. Be open with him about your personal struggles. If you’re sick and want your doctor to help you, you can’t sit there on the table, fully-dressed, smiling, and telling him you feel like a million bucks. He needs to know where you hurt and how you hurt if he’s going to help you. The more he knows about your sickness, the better he’ll be at prescribing the right medicine. So it is with your pastor. The more you tell him about your struggles, your sins, your addictions, your regrets—all the ills from which you suffer—the better physician of your soul he will be. This may take place in a more structured format such as private confession and absolution, or it may be in a less liturgical setting. Wherever it happens, this deeper knowledge of his flock will in turn deepen the pastor’s preaching, for the better he knows what’s going on inside his hearers, the better he will be inside the pulpit as he applies the healing balm of the Gospel.

3. Give your pastor honest feedback about his sermons. Very often the only substantive feedback a pastor gets about his sermons is from his wife. As helpful as that may be, he needs to hear from you, too. And a word to you pastors: pray for humility and thick skin so that you will receive this honest feedback—be it positive or negative—with gratitude. Hear me well: I’m not advocating that parishioners critique sermons like a movie critic rates the latest Hollywood blockbuster. Rather, you should freely communicate with your pastor if anything about his sermons troubles you, seems unclear, or just plain doesn’t square with your understanding of the word of God. To remain silent about preaching that could be improved, clarified, or corrected, only gives voice to apathy. At the same time, express to him how thankful you are for his bold adherence to pure doctrine, and for placing before you, week after week, the good news of Jesus Christ crucified and resurrected for you. Like any Christian, pastors too need vocal encouragement to remain steadfast and faithful in their vocation.

4. Ask your pastor questions about the sermon. This dovetails with the point made above concerning feedback. Some biblical texts are harder to understand than others. And if you think these biblical knots are hard to untie, try preparing a sermon on them! It can be a formidable task. So if you listen to a sermon on one of these passages, or any text for that matter, where certain issues still remain difficult for you to understand, then don’t be afraid to ask your pastor about them. Chances are he has many insights into that passage of Scripture that he chose not to include in the sermon. Your post-homily conversation will give him a chance to explain the biblical story more fully, and you to understand it more clearly. And your questions will reveal to him ways in which he can provide even greater clarity to his hearers about this passage of Scripture in his ongoing proclamation of it.

5. Be a faithful student in the Bible Class your pastor teaches. I cannot overemphasize this point. To put it quite simply: the deeper knowledge you have of the Bible, the deeper understanding you will have of biblical preaching. And the deeper understanding you have of both the Bible and biblical preaching will enable your pastor to be a better preacher for you. Imagine how frustrating it would be for a high school teacher who wants to introduce his students to the beauties and intricacies of Shakespeare, to discover that many in the class only want to read the CliffsNotes. Unfortunately, a parallel situation often exists in congregations. The pastor wishes to lead his hearers more deeply into the Scriptures, but many of them only want to skim the surface. Immerse yourself in the word of God with your pastor, ask him questions, listen to the discussions, ponder how all the biblical stories fit together in Christ. What you learn from your pastor in Bible class, as well as what he learns from his interaction with you and other students of the word, will have a direct and positive impact on his preaching.

6. Encourage your pastor to study God’s word with other pastors.  The best pulpits are crowded pulpits. Surrounding your pastor are patriarchs and prophets, apostles and evangelists, college and seminary professors, fellow saints and sinners—everyone whom Christ has used to shape your shepherd’s preaching. Especially helpful to your pastor are his fellow proclaimers. Like him, they wrestle weekly with the word, know the angst of the office, and strive to preach faithfully in their own parishes. These men lean on and learn from each other. If your pastor regularly studies the Scriptures with other pastors, encourage him to continue to do so. Indeed, encourage your fellow members to respect that time he has with his brothers in the ministry. What they learn from him, and what he learns from them, will enrich the preaching that you and your fellow Christians hear.

7. Protect the time your pastor needs for sermon preparation.  One of the earliest recorded problems faced by the church was that the apostles were so overburdened that they were in danger of neglecting the real duties of their office (Acts 6:1ff). It wasn’t right, they said, for them to “neglect the word of God in order to serve tables.” The duties of the office of the ministry are weighty enough without your pastor also being asked to make sure the church lawn gets mowed, the budget prepared, pews dusted, and a thousand other responsibilities that someone else can take care of. Protect the time he needs to be fully engaged in the real duties of his office, which includes study of the Scriptures on which he will preaching. The more time he has to prepare a homily, the better his proclamation to you will be.

8. Gift your pastor with helpful, trustworthy preaching resources. There is a wealth of material available for pastors who are looking for fresh and faithful ways to preach. There are journals and books, seminars and conferences, as well as online resources. The only problem is that there’s a price tag attached to most of these. And the ministry not being the most lucrative calling there is, sometimes that cost is prohibitive. Every pastor has a birthday, an ordination anniversary day, and he too sets up a Christmas tree. Why not ask him if there’s a preaching resource he’d like as a gift? Not only will he profit from that gift, so will you as you see it bear fruit in the pulpit.

9. Be “all there” when you’re in the pew. Imagine what your reaction would be if you placed a costly gift into the lap of your child, only to have him reach for his phone to text a friend, or yawn then fall asleep, or turn to a friend to begin a whispered conversation, all the while ignoring the gift you had worked so hard to give him. Every sermon your pastor preaches is his gift to you; indeed, it is the Lord’s gift to you, His saving word wrapped in your pastor’s words. He places that gift in your lap every Sunday. Receive it with attentiveness, thankfulness, faithfulness. Make eye contact with your pastor as he preaches. What you communicate nonverbally says volumes about what you think of his preaching. And, believe me, he notices every yawn, every whispered conversation, every head down not-so-secretly texting or Facebooking or tweeting or whatever else you might be doing that amounts to a despising of the divine word you are ignoring. You took the time to be in church; when you’re there, be all there.

10. Pray for your pastor. It’s common for pastors to spend a few moments in prayer before they enter the pulpit. Perhaps they pray something like Psalm 19:14, “Let the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart be acceptable in Your sight.” Echo that prayer with your own. Ask the Lord to bless your pastor’s words, to give you repentance and faith to hear them aright. And continue to pray even as he preaches. Translate his words of law into prayers of repentance. Respond to his words of grace with prayers of thanksgiving. Preaching is not a monologue; it is a conversation, partly spoken aloud, partly prayed silently, between you, your pastor, and Jesus Christ. Before, during, after your pastor preaches, endeavor to pray for him and yourself and all who are present, that the words from your pastor’s mouth and the meditations of every heart present, may be acceptable in the sight of the Lord of the church.

There are, no doubt, other ways besides these ten suggestions by which you can help your pastor become an even better preacher. And, if you are so inclined, I encourage you to write about those ideas in the comment section of my blog. I offer these, however, as some ways in which you can help the man whom God has called to serve you in the stead and by the command of Jesus Christ.

++++++

If you enjoy my writings, and would like to read more of them, check out my two recently published books, one of hymns and poetry, and one of meditations and sermons. The Infant Priest is a collection of about 20 hymns and 90 poems. Christ Alone contains brief meditations and sermons that are steeped in the language of creation, the Passover, the worship life of Israel, and the Gospels. Click on either of the titles, or visit Amazon.com, to read more and find out how you can purchase a copy. Thank you for your interest!

Advertisements

Single Post Navigation

11 thoughts on “Ten Ways You Can Help Your Pastor Be an Even Better Preacher

  1. In seminary I’m sure you’re taught to do exegesis and not eisegesis. We don’t ever hear exegesis. It’s a great article, all your advice has been done and rejected. But most don’t care anyway.

  2. Pingback: Ten ways you can help your pastor be an even preacher. | Emmaus Lutheran Church, Drayton Valley, Alberta

  3. Great stuff! One addition: give moms with young kids a hand, especially if they are flying solo. If the pastor has young children, your congregation will have at least one family where dad can’t be in the pew with the rest of the family to help out (and certainly there are times where mom isn’t at church and a dad is with the kids). There’s also a good chance that there might be others. Fussy kids can derail almost anyone’s attention. Not only will you be helping out the parent, but your other brothers and sisters in Christ.

    So ask if you can help: hold the hymnal, hold the baby… maybe even hold the baby in the cry room/narthex so mom(or dad) can listen to the sermon for the first time in a while.

  4. Hoping that you’ll see this comment, Chad. I enjoyed your article but must admit, I happened upon it because of the title. It’s much too long of a story to relate in a simple comment here but, my husband and I and many members of the church have been trying to lovingly relate our feelings to the pastor on his soft, feel good, messages of nothing but milk. Our church is floundering because there’s no deep teaching in God’s word. His main concern is getting the seats filled but no concern for feeding the flock that is there. I fear my comment does not do the problem justice. Your post is a good one but not when the Pastor wants nothing to do with these this type of feedback from the congregation. It’s a frustration for sure. Would love to chat more about it with hopes of some insight. TY for a good blog!

    • I wish there were an easy solution to such problems, Rose, but there rarely are. Some people choose to stick it out, some leave for another church where they will be fed. I will say that, if my pastor were not preaching the Gospel of Jesus Christ and Him crucified, and I had tried all I could to alter that situation, but to no avail, that I would find a shepherd who would. These gifts are too precious, and too necessary, to do without.

      • Thanks for the reply, Chad. Much appreciated. Good advice albeit sad advice. It is a shame that the Gospel is getting watered down in order to make it easier to swallow. We’ve been determined to do what we can with a whole lot of prayer, to be an influence for good in the body. It may very well come down to what you said. Again, good blog. Keep writing the truth.

  5. Lisa Casserly on said:

    I just wanted to thank you so much for this article. We are in the process of calling a new Pastor to fill the vacancy in our congregation. My “old” Pastor posted the link to your pages some months ago, and I thank God for it, and for him. Please keep up the good work. The things you say are wonderful and things we need to hear. For most of my life, I didn’t really think of the Pastor as being a real human being, just like me. I know that sounds so stupid. I’m not sure WHAT I was really thinking, beyond maybe considering him to be something like a piece of furniture that belonged to the church. (Oh, God; please forgive me for that! I shudder to think what kind of damage and neglect I might have inadvertently caused!) Some years ago, there was a similar article in The Lutheran Witness, which really spurred thought (and some action on my part!), and this is a perfect reminder at a perfect time for me. Thank you again!

    • Thank you, Lisa, for your comment. As well as your honesty! At one point in our lives, I think we’ve all thought of the pastor as just another piece of furniture that belonged to the church. Or we’ve expected him to be some sort of super-saint, who has a level of sanctity above that of the typical Christian. But, of course, he faces the same temptations, commits the same sins, struggles with the same weaknesses that we all do. In other words, he lives wholly by the grace of Christ, as everyone does. I’m glad my article resonated with you. And I pray for your congregation as the Holy Spirit works through all of you to call a new shepherd. May he be a blessings to you, as you are to him.

  6. Pastor Joel Haak on said:

    Chad, I have been blessed your writing in recent months. Could I have your permission to pare this down a bit for a church newsletter, and then direct people to the fuller source? All with proper attribution, of course. God’s blessings!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: